My name is Brian Hale. I’m a board certified urologist working with Advanced Urology Institute.

So patients who have kidney stones usually complain of flank pain, which is where the pain would be behind the lower ribs and sometimes it wraps around towards the front [and] down towards the groin area. Those are the most common symptoms, [sometimes] they’ll also have blood in the urine on our testing in the office.

Usually we’ll get an ultrasound or CT scan that diagnoses the stone, it’ll tell us the size and location. If the stones are smaller [about] less than 4 millimeters in size, ninety (90) percent of those times it will pass on their own. So on those patients, I give them a chance to try to pass the stone before we operate on them. When they’re bigger, they’ll be more than 6 millimeters in size, the less of a change of passing [the stone], less than ten (10) percent. For those patients, we look at the scheduling surgery for.

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