What to know about Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction, also commonly referred to as ED, is the inability for a man to maintain an erection for sexual activity. Although it can be an embarrassing subject to talk about, it is very common. Fifty percent of men over the age of 50 experience some degree of ED. It is important to know that there are plenty of treatment options available. As Luis Camacho, PA explains, “We have several patients with erectile dysfunction, and we can be very helpful with treatment and procedures.”

Luis Camacho, PA of Fort Myers, FLA man experiencing the symptoms of erectile dysfunction can make an appointment to discuss the issue with his urologist. A conversation about the patient’s medical history and symptoms can usually lead to an in-office diagnosis. Once diagnosed, and it is determined that the patient is healthy enough for sexual activity, the urologist and patient can discuss treatment options. Many patients find themselves surprised by the number of treatment options available to them.

The most common and familiar treatment for ED is medication. Pills are easy to take and highly effective in many cases. For this reason, most urologists start treating ED by prescribing one of the many pill options available. Another simple option is the vacuum erection device. For this treatment, a man inserts his penis into the cylindrical pump that works like a vacuum to draw blood to the penis resulting in an erection. A band then goes around the base of penis in order to maintain the erection. Yet another option is injection therapy. A patient using this therapy will give himself a small, nearly painless injection into the base of the penis. The injection stimulates an erection for a certain amount of time.

Some cases call for more invasive treatments. With a penile prothesis, an implant is surgically inserted into the penis. A pump in the scrotum that is attached to the prosthesis is used to create the erection.

When facing erectile dysfunction, it is important to know that you are not the only person dealing with this issue, and there are plenty of treatment options available that help men lead normal and satisfying sexual lives. All it takes is a conversation with a urologist at the Advanced Urology Institute to find the best ED treatment for you.

Erectile Dysfunction Overview

Erectile dysfunction (male impotence) is a man’s inability to achieve or maintain an erection with enough firmness to have satisfying sex. Occasional erectile dysfunction (ED) is common and many men experience it when undergoing some form of stress. But frequent ED can be a sign of serious health, emotional or relationship problems that require the attention of a professional.

How common is erectile dysfunction?

Roughly 30 million men in the United States have problems achieving or maintaining an erection. The frequency of ED increases with age, affecting only 5-40% of men in their 40’s and up to 50-80% of men over 70 years. However, while the risk of ED increases with age, the condition is not an inevitable consequence of aging. Good health is the key to a lifetime of good sexual function.

Who is at risk of erectile dysfunction?

Dr. James Renehan of Tallahassee, FLApart from occurring frequently among the elderly, ED is often a consequence of poor emotional and physical health. It is common in men with high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, prostate disease, anxiety, damage from surgery or cancer, injuries, stress, depression, performance anxiety, relationship problems, alcohol use, smoking, and drug use. Typically, ED is caused by vascular disease (such as atherosclerosis) that prevents blood supply to the penis, a neurological disorder (like multiple sclerosis) that cuts transmission of nerve impulses to the penis, chronic medical disorders such as Peyronie’s disease, stroke and diabetes, trauma, and operations for bladder, colon and prostate cancer which may affect blood supply to the penis. These risk factors may work singly or in combination.

How is erectile dysfunction treated?

When you visit a urologist, the first step in the diagnosis of the problem is a thorough sexual, medical and psychosocial history. Physical examination with emphasis on the genitourinary, neurologic and vascular systems is performed. From the information gathered, the urologist may request hormone tests (testosterone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid – stimulating hormone, prolactin and serum hormone-binding globulin), urinalysis, PSA (prostate-specific antigen), lipid profile, and serum chemistry. Functional tests such as prostaglandin E1 injection, formal neurologic testing, nocturnal penile tumescence testing and biothesiometry may be requested, together with imaging studies such as transrectal, testes and penile ultrasonography and angiography.

If erectile dysfunction is diagnosed, the doctor may recommend treatment depending on the cause and severity of the condition. For instance, the urologist may recommend sexual counseling when no organic causes can be established for the problem. Oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil or avanafil may be offered to relieve the problem. But for those not responding to oral medicines, the urologist may inject, implant or direct the topical application of drugs such as alprostadil, phentolamine or papaverine. In some cases, an external vacuum or constriction device may be recommended while for other patients hormone replacement therapy may be used to treat severe hypogonadism (lower-than-normal testosterone). Alternatively, the urologist may opt for surgery through procedures such as revascularization, placement of penile implant or surgical correction of venous outflow.

How is erectile dysfunction prevented?

  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet that avoids saturated fats and increases the intake of vegetables, fruits and whole grains.
  • Reduce cholesterol levels through exercise, medication and diet.
  • Maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Seek prompt treatment or professional help for conditions such as stress, depression, hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.

At Advanced Urology Institute, we recognize that effective treatment of erectile dysfunction involves a proper determination of the underlying cause and a frank discussion of both medical and non-medical options. This is why we have assembled an accomplished team of physicians, state-of-the-art facilities and a patient-centered system that responds to the unique needs of each patient. If you are experiencing a urological problem, make an appointment today. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

What are the treatment options for erectile dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction is a common disorder that affects men of all ages. It is a man’s inability to get and maintain an erection. There are many different causes of ED and in many cases there is more than one underlying cause. All a urologist needs is a physical exam and a few questions answered in order to diagnose erectile dysfunction in a patient.

Dr. Brian Hale - Urologist at Palm Harbor, FLFor urologists like Dr. Brian Hale, treatment for erectile dysfunction begins with trying three different medications. The medications are generally oral and easy to take. The urologist will monitor the results of the oral drugs with the patient. Very often, at least one of the oral drugs prescribed will resolve the issue. For these cases, the urologist will write a prescription for the drug and continue to monitor its effectiveness through routine appointments.

If the urologist and the patient are unable to find an oral medication that works effectively, there are other options to consider. One possibility is injection therapy. Small injections into the shaft of the penis are used to dilate the penile arteries, helping increase blood flow, causing an erection. For most men who do not see results with the oral medication, injection therapy is their next best option.

For many men, injection therapy can seem a bit overwhelming at first, maybe even frightening. But in reality, the injections are easy to administer and are relatively painless. The urologist and the patient will begin the injection therapy with a teaching session at the urologist’s office. The urologist may use an ultrasound to monitor the reaction of the blood vessels to the injection to help determine the right dosage for the patient. The patient is also taught how to administer the injection on his own.

Patients are generally pleased after they start injection therapy. The teaching session at the office helps the patient see that the injections are not painful and can easily be done at home. It is very rare that a patient cannot do the injection therapy himself. For those who did not respond positively to the oral drugs, injection therapy is an ideal treatment to produce the desired results and overcome the erectile dysfunction.

Treating erectile dysfunction is an important part of a patient’s well being, both personally and within his relationships. The urologists of the Advanced Urology Institute offer many options for treatment and remain committed to finding the best one for each patient. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Talk With Your Doctor About Erectile Dysfunction

The first step in treating erectile dysfunction is talking to your doctor about it. Unfortunately, for many men this can be difficult as erectile dysfunction is often a sensitive subject for those experiencing it. However, the issue is far more common than most men realize. As Chelsea Ferrell , physician assistant, states, “Fifty percent of men over 50 have some degree of erectile dysfunction, so you do not have to be embarrassed to speak to your doctor about it.” Urologists and PAs discuss erectile dysfunction with patients on a daily basis.

Chelsie Ferrell, Physician Assistant at DeLand, FLUrologists can usually diagnose erectile dysfunction during the appointment by asking a few questions about medical history and having a conversation with the patient. Once diagnosed, urologists try to discuss erectile dysfunction with the patient by reassuring him that even in the most severe cases there are still plenty of treatment options available. Because there are so many options available, the decision really is up to the patient working with his urologist to decide the best treatment for a successful outcome in his case.

There are plenty of different treatments available for erectile dysfunction and, in many cases, if one does not work another will. The most common options are pills like Viagra and Cialis, or generic versions of these pills that offer the same effects at a lower price. Others prefer the vacuum erection device. This is a cylindrical pump that the penis goes into and works like a vacuum to draw blood to the area, with a band that goes around the base of the penis to keep the erection.

Many men respond to at least one of these treatments. However, for those who do not there are still plenty of options. The urologist may want to try injection therapy. Men can give themselves small, relatively pain-free injections of a treatment into the base of the penis that will stimulate an erection. If injection treatment does not help, then the urologist may suggest a penile prosthesis. An implant is surgically inserted into the penis attached to a pump in the scrotum that can be used to give the patient an erection. This treatment will correct the patient’s erectile dysfunction for life.

Talking to your doctor about an issue as common as erectile dysfunction does not have to be an uncomfortable experience. And with the many options available now to treat erectile dysfunction, the right option is just a conversation away. Chelsea Ferrell PA at the Advanced Urology Institute is one of the many friendly and intelligent professionals helping patients find their best treatment option. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Discussing a Sensitive Topic: Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile Dysfunction, also called ED, is the inability for a man to get or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual activity. It is a very personal and sensitive issue that can be difficult to talk about. Although ED is a common issue that affects many men, it can still cause feelings of embarrassment and shame. This makes open conversations, even with a trusted urologist, difficult in some cases.

Dr. Billy Vanasupa of St Augustine, FLA urologist is a doctor who specializes in the urinary tract and male reproductive system. They are the doctor a patient will most likely to go to about his ED. Urologists see countless cases of ED on a regular basis, and to them it is not a major issue at all. However, good urologists understand that ED can be an embarrassing issue for their patients and they immediately begin their visits by creating a comfortable environment where doctor and patient feel at ease discussing it.

One such urologist who works to create a comfortable environment is Dr. Billy Vanasupa. When talking about his approach with patients who see him for ED, Dr. Vanasupa says, “I always try to make my visits light, make some jokes here and there, and make them feel comfortable.” His goal is to make his patients laugh so they are less nervous and feel they can easily talk to him. Dr. Vanasupa removes the stigma of ED so he and his patient can openly discuss this sensitive topic.

Once everyone is comfortable discussing the topic, the urologist will ask background questions like whether the ED occurred slowly or abruptly. The patient will be asked if he has tried any medications. The doctor’s questions are to help determine root causes for the issue and will include asking about diet, alcohol and drug use, and stress factors. Finding possible causes for ED is an important first step in treating it.

The urologist and patient will discuss best treatment options for ED. In many cases, oral medication, possibly along with some minor lifestyle adjustments, will fix the issue and allow healthy men to return to their normal sexual activity. For some men, oral medication does not help. The urologist may suggest injections. Patients will learn in the office how to administer a very low-pain injection at the base of the penis. There are very few cases where neither the oral or injected medication solves the issue.

Outcomes are best when the patient feels comfortable talking to his urologist about sensitive issues. The Advanced Urology Institute has urologists who can treat erectile dysfunction in a way that puts a patient at ease. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

How common is erectile dysfuntion?

Erectile dysfunction, also known as ED, is the inability of a man to get or maintain an erection firm enough for intercourse. ED is a very common issue that can negatively affect a man’s self-confidence and his relationship with his partner. Many men see urologists for help with ED when this happens.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLThe primary symptom of ED is trouble getting and maintaining an erection, and reduced sexual desire is often associated with it. There are many factors that can cause ED, and they can be divided into two categories: mental and physical. Depression, anxiety and stress are mental factors that can cause ED. There are also physical factors, including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and substance abuse. There are plenty of cases when it is a combination of mental and physical factors that cause ED.

All men are at risk for erectile dysfunction; however, there are some factors that increase the likelihood of developing it. Heart disease and diabetes are key risk factors that increase the likelihood of ED. Tobacco use causes damage to arteries, restricting blood flow and raising the chances of ED. Drug and alcohol use are risk factors as well. Men who are overweight, and especially those who are obese, are also at greater risk of developing erectile dysfunction.

A urologist can diagnose ED by performing a physical exam and asking a few questions. Once diagnosed, urologists can consider a variety of options for treatment, depending on the patient. The first option is usually oral medication. Urologists will try different medications to help patients maintain erections. If none are effective, then the urologist may prescribe injections. Small injections can be made to the shaft of the penis that dilate the blood vessels in the penis, allowing better blood flow and erections. The patient can administer these injections himself as needed.

Erectile dysfunction is not uncommon and as Dr. David Harris says about treating it, “As urologists, we are the leading authority.” Urologists see cases of ED on a daily basis and are accustomed to having conversations about it and finding the best way to solve the issue with their patients. In most cases a patient who is motivated to work with his urologist on finding the best treatment will eventually find a solution that works. The Advanced Urology Institute helps many patients explore their options and treat their ED so they can continue their normal lives and activities. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Options

Although it is very common, erectile dysfunction can be an embarrassing subject to discuss even with medical professionals. ED can affect men of all ages and can be caused by a variety of factors, so a wide range of treatment options are available.

How Is Erectile Dysfunction Diagnosed?

According to the Mayo Clinic, ED is the chronic inability to get and maintain an erection. It can be diagnosed by talking with a doctor, ideally a urologist, about the patient’s medical history. The doctor may perform a series of tests, including a physical exam, blood or urine tests, an ultrasound, or even a psychological examination to determine if mental health is a factor in the patient’s erectile dysfunction. Sometimes ED is connected to another underlying issue. All of these factors come into play when determining treatment.

What Are The Treatment Options For Erectile Dysfunction?

Mikhail Lezhak, PA of Daytona Beach, FLThere are many potential steps to be taken in the ED treatment process. The first step, especially when the patient is a younger man, is usually medical management. Doctors may prescribe common medications like Viagra or Cialis. Both medications are taken only when needed. They do not help cause an erection until the patient has already become sexually stimulated. They are safe, commonly prescribed medications; however, they can cause serious side effects in combination with other medicines, especially nitrates.

For many patients, Viagra or Cialis is enough to help solve the problem of erectile dysfunction. If, however, they are not, another option is a penile injection. The initial penile injection may be given at the doctor’s office as a way to introduce the patient to the process. After this introduction, the patient can self-administer the injections at home as needed.

When these medications are not enough to solve a patient’s erectile dysfunction, another option is penile implant surgery. This is only recommended in cases where no other treatment option has been successful and when the patient’s ED has no chance of being reversed. There are a variety of penile implants on the market to accommodate a patient’s lifestyle and needs.

Erectile dysfunction can lead to feelings of embarrassment and shame, relationship difficulties and lowered self-confidence. However, there is no need to worry that these issues will last a lifetime. With the wide range of treatment options available, ED can be managed, allowing patients to resume normal sexual activity after consulting with their doctor. Our team of urologists at Advanced Urology Institute have extensive experience in working with patients experiencing erectile dysfunction. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

What is Erectile Dysfunction and How to Treat it?

Erectile dysfunction is the inability to have or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. Any man may find himself occasionally unable to achieve an erection. That is normal. It is only when this inability becomes a sustained everyday occurrence that he may consider the possibility of erectile dysfunction.

The main factor for erectile dysfunction is aging, starting about the age of 50. Over 50 percent of men over 50 suffer from erectile dysfunction. Other risk factors include cardiovascular disease, high blood sugar, high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels. Emotional and mental conditions such as depression and anxiety also can cause erectile dysfunction.

Treating Erectile Dysfunction

Men who suffer from erectile dysfunction have a number of treatment options. If it is a symptom of an underlying illness, treatment should be focused on the underlying illness. When erectile dysfunction appears with no underlying cause, the following treatment options are available and are highly successful.

1. Oral Medication. These are pills given to increase blood flow to the penis, thus causing an erection. The most common ones are vardenafil or Levitra, Cialis or tadalafil, viagra and avanafil. Oral medication is most successful in patients with mild cases of erectile dysfunction.

2. Penile injections. The most common injectible drug is alprostadil. Using a very fine needle, a patient injects the drug into the base of the penis. The drug increases the size of the arteries that supply blood to the penis. Alprostadil also can be administered by placing a small alprostadil suppository at the opening of the penis, rather than by injection.

3. Vacuum erection device. This is a tube with a hand or battery powered pump. The tube is placed over the penis and the pump is used to draw air out, creating a vacuum. The vacuum thus draws blood into the penis, causing an erection.

4. Penile implants. A minor surgical procedure is used to introduce bendable rods at the sides of the penis. These rods give the penis a firmness that allows for intercourse. An alternative of the rods is the insertion of fluid filled cylinders connected to a pump placed in the scrotum. Engaging the pump inflates the cylinders which causes the penis to firm up.

It is advisable for men, especially those approaching age 50, to maintain a healthy relationship with a urologist. An experienced urologist can diagnose and offer advice on the best treatment options. It is also important to stay informed on the causes, signs and symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Many professional sites, such as the one maintained by the Advanced Urology Institute, are very helpful. Advanced Urology Institute also has an experienced team of specialists who can help with consultation, diagnosis and treatment. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

What Treatments Are Available For ED?

Erectile dysfunction is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. It is not incidental to aging, though in reality it occurs mostly in men over the age of 40. The causes of erectile dysfunction are varied, and the first step is to establish whether it is caused by an underlying condition. Whatever the cause, however, there are various options when it comes to the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

1. Oral Medication (Pills)

Like many other medical conditions, erectile dysfunction can be treated effectively by taking medicine. Oral medicines for erectile dysfunction fall under a group called phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE 5) inhibitors. They work by preventing the functioning of the enzyme phosphodiesterase type 5 whose job is to control blood flow to the penile arteries. When the enzyme is not functioning, blood vessels relax, allowing blood to reach the penis, therefore causing an erection. The most common PDE 5 inhibitors are:

a. Sildenafil- commonly referred to as Viagra
b. Avanafil – also known as Stendra
c. Tadalafil – also known as Ciaris; and
d. Varednafil- also known as Levitra

Most of these medications are widely available. It is necessary, however, to consult with a urologist before taking any of them. A trained urologist should be able to assess a patient’s condition and advise whether oral medication is likely to work and if so, which of the available medicines is best suited to the patient’s case.

2. Penile implants

For some men, especially those with underlying conditions, oral medication does not work. They may have to resort to other treatment options and the most common of these is the penile implant. This involves a minor surgical procedure and the placing of an implant that causes an erection. There are two choices when it comes to the implant. There is the inflatable implant and the malleable/ semi-rigid implant. Both options have their advantages and disadvantages and the patient will decide based on his circumstances. Overall, however, both implant options report a success rate of over 90 percent.

3. Vascular reconstructive surgery.

Vascular reconstructive surgery involves reconstructing the arteries within the penis to increase blood flow. This last option is neither common nor popular. It is a very difficult, and therefore expensive, procedure. Additionally, it is not always successful and a patient might face the risk of relapse.

It is possible to treat erectile dysfunction. But the right treatment option must be sought for each individual case. It is recommended that anyone experiencing erectile dysfunction should see a urologist. The highly qualified and experienced urologists at Advanced Urology Institute can provide consultation, technology and treatment plans to help patients with erectile dysfunction. Want to find out more about erectile dysfunction? Visit the “Advanced Urology Institute” site.

Ways to Treat Erectile Dysfunction

If you suspect that you have erectile dysfunction, you need to talk to your doctor about it. Then you can work with the doctor to determine the underlying factor or cause of the condition. Actually, ED can only be effectively treated if what is causing it is known. In fact, you may find that your condition improves with only simple lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, quitting smoking or drinking less alcohol. And if it is a medication you’re taking that is causing the problem, your doctor may treat the condition by reducing the dosage or having you try another drug.The treatment options for ED include lifestyle changes, counseling, medications, penile injections, vacuum pumps and surgery.

1. Lifestyle changes

Making lifestyle changes can reduce the severity or improve erectile dysfunction. Some of the changes are:

a. Quitting smoking
b. Stopping or reducing alcohol consumption
c. Increasing physical activity or exercise
d. Cutting down body weight
e. Stopping the use of illegal drugs

2. Seeing a counselor

Your urologist may recommend that you see a counselor if your erectile dysfunction is worsened by psychological or emotional issues. In many cases, counselors require that you go with your partner to the counseling sessions so she can know how best to support you. And as you work on the anxiety and stress issues with your counselor, your urologist will be focused on treating any underlying physical issues. Usually only a handful of sessions with the counselor will be enough for you to overcome ED.

3. Medication

The first treatment that your urologist will offer to treat ED is oral pills. Common oral medications for ED include:

a. Sildenafil (Viagra)
b. Tadalafil (Cialis)
c. Vardenafil (Levitra or Staxyn)
d. Avanafil (Stendra).

These medicines work by relaxing your smooth muscles and increasing blood supply to the penis following sexual stimulation. You’ll be required to take them anywhere from 15 minutes to 36 hours before sex, depending on the particular drug your doctor has prescribed. Vardenafil (Staxyn) dissolves in the mouth, but the other pills are swallowed. However, you aren’t allowed to take any of these drugs more than once per day. The drugs are effective in about 80 percent of men who use them, although if you have an erection that lasts beyond 4 hours, you should seek emergency medical help.

You should not take these medicines as treatment for ED if you are already taking nitrates for a heart disorder. Since nitrates also relax and widen blood vessels, their combination with these drugs leads to a sudden reduction of your blood pressure, which may cause falling, fainting or dizziness and possible injuries. Likewise, if you are already taking drugs to treat enlarged prostate (BPH), inform your doctor about them. A combination of BPH medications called alpha-blockers with ED medicines also may result in sudden reduction of your blood pressure.

In case your erectile dysfunction is due to low testosterone levels, the urologist may prescribe testosterone. However, testosterone therapy won’t work for you if you have nerve or circulatory problems. So you must be very open with your urologist about your other medical problems before you are given any medications.

4. Penile injections

Injecting the penis with a drug called alprostadil can trigger a stronger and firmer erection. While oral medications are able to cause an erection after sexual stimulation, you can’t get an automatic erection with them. That’s why your doctor may at times opt for injecting a drug into the penis to ensure you achieve erection automatically even without sexual stimulation.

5. Vacuum constriction devices (pumps)

Vacuum pumps pull blood into the penis, resulting in an erection. A typical vacuum device is an external pump supplied with a band that you can use to achieve and maintain an erection. According to several studies, up to 50-80 percent of men who have used vacuum erection devices are pleased with the results.

A vacuum device has three components:

a. A plastic tube (cylinder), which you place toward the end of your penis.
b. A pump, which drives out air from the tube in order to create a vacuum.
c. An elastic ring (band), which you place on the cylinder, on the other end applied to your body, and then move it from the tube to the penis in order to maintain erection.

To use the vacuum erection device, you place the pump over your penis and pump out air from the tube (cylinder) to create a vacuum. The vacuum then pulls blood into the penis’ shaft and makes the penis longer and firmer. Once the penis is erect, and with the help of a lubricant, you slide the retaining band downward onto the lower end of your penis. You also remove the pump once you have released the vacuum.

The elastic ring sustains the erection by stopping blood from moving back into the body during intercourse. So you can only attempt intercourse with the elastic ring in place. And the ring can be left in place for about 30 minutes to enable successful intercourse.

6. Penile prosthesis (Penile implant surgery)

Another option for treating ED is penile prosthesis in which your urologist performs an operation to implant either a malleable (bendable) device or inflatable device into your penis. A penile implant surgery is preferred when you have an obvious medical condition that is causing the ED and the urologist is sure that your condition won’t resolve naturally or with medications.

Usually, the simplest form of penile prosthesis is surgical implantation of malleable rods inside the erection chambers of your penis. Once implanted, the rods ensure that your penis is maintained in semi-rigid state and just requires lifting or adjusting to erect position for sexual intercourse. Malleable rods are a good option if you’ve had spinal injury or have limited hand strength.

Alternatively, your doctor may go for a hydraulic, inflatable implant. With this prosthesis, you can choose to get an erection when you need to. Inflatable implants increase the size of the penis through a pump that’s located in the scrotum. The advantage of an inflatable implant over malleable rods is that the erection is more natural and easier to conceal than one achieved with malleable rods.

Penile implant surgery takes about one hour to complete and is usually performed in an outpatient setting. Following penile implant surgery, you’ll be able to leave the hospital the same day after surgery and can resume sexual intercourse 4-6 weeks after the procedure.

7. Artery reconstruction (Vascular reconstructive surgery)

Artery reconstruction is often a last resort treatment for ED because the procedure is costly, technically difficult and does not usually work. But the aim of the procedure, when recommended, is to boost blood flow in your penis and help you achieve an erection. During the operation, the urologist transfers an artery in another part of your body (usually from a muscle in the belly) to one in your penis, creating a path for blood to move around the blocked (affected) area. The procedure is only rarely considered, but may be an option for men younger than 30 who have ED because of injuries to their penis or the area around it.
Want to find out more about erectile dysfunction? Visit the “Advanced Urology Institute” site.