Vaginal Dryness: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Has sex been giving you more discomfort than pleasure lately? Do you experience pain, irritation, burning or dryness? Is there bleeding or spotting during or after sex?

If there is, then you might be experiencing vaginal dryness.

For this condition, you may need to speak with a female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) physician for help. At Advanced Urology Institute, we have FPMRS physicians at our Fort Myers center to ensure you get prompt attention from a location near you.

But first, what is vaginal dryness?

Vaginal dryness refers to a persistent irritating, burning, or itching sensation in the vagina. It is due to inadequate vaginal moisture that makes it feel too dry or too tight. The condition is more noticeable during sexual intercourse as it results in pain and discomfort.

Learn more about vaginal dryness, it’s causes, symptoms and treatment.

What is vaginal pain?

If something does go wrong down there, it can hurt a lot, incessantly presenting with a sharp pain or a constant unbearable ache. This pain can interfere with your sex life, your ability to socialize, and ultimately your quality of life.

What is vaginal pain?

It is chronic pain and discomfort in the vagina, usually with no known cause. Although the specific form of the condition varies with the underlying condition, it can be severe and excruciating to the point of interfering with your life. That’s why you need to see a female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) physician for help.

At Advanced Urology Institute in Fort Myers, we have FPMRS physicians who ensure you get a diagnosis and treatment for vaginal pain.

Know more about the causes, symptoms and how it’s treated here.

Frequently Asked Questions About Urinary Incontinence

As we grow older, our lives go through many changes, not to mention our bodies as well. These varieties of physical changes may be inconvenient, difficult, or even devastating.

One common uncomfortable change that the body goes through as it ages is urinary continence.

What is urinary incontinence?

Urinary incontinence is the loss of bladder control which results in accidental urine leakage. The leakage can happen suddenly, in small or large amounts.
Urine is a liquid by-product produced by the kidneys when it filters waste from the blood. It then flows through the ureter and is stored in the bladder. When the bladder is full, its nerves will send a signal that will make you feel the need to pee. When you urinate, the bladder muscles will tighten to push and release urine out through the urethra.

The urethra has sphincter muscles that control the release of urine. These muscles are strong enough to keep the urethra shut, which then helps you hold your pee.
However, when you have incontinence, your bladder muscles tend to suddenly tighten while the sphincter muscles are too weak to keep the urethra shut. As a result, you may experience a sudden, strong urge to pass urine, and are more likely to experience urine leakage from stress and pressure from activities, such as exercising, or even just by sneezing and laughing.

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How Often Should Women See A Urologist

Female Urinary Incontinence: Lauren Masters, ARNPMy name is Lauren Masters with Advanced Urology Institute.

When we’re looking at urinary incontinence, for example, most women are having some degree of incontinence; whether it be soaking through one (1) pad a day or wearing depends all day long. Usually we can get someone at a minimum to a 50% improvement. It varies based on your history, your basic demographic and whatever else is going on in your body, but a lot of times we can get you to a good 50% and there are many women we can get to 80-90 [percent] and even a complete resolution of their issues.

Women have many treatment options for urinary incontinence

Female Urinary Incontinence: Lauren Masters, ARNPMy name is Lauren Masters with Advanced Urology Institute. When we’re looking at urinary incontinence, for example, most women are having some degree of incontinence; whether it be soaking through one (1) pad a day or wearing depends all day long.

Usually we can get someone at a minimum to a 50% improvement. It varies based on your history, your basic demographic and whatever else is going on in your body, but a lot of times we can get you to a good 50% and there are many women we can get to 80-90 [percent] and even a complete resolution of their issues.

UroLift Procedure for BPH

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) can be described as the blockage of urine as it tries to flow from the bladder, through the urethra, and out of the body. It occurs when an enlarged prostate begins to pinch the urethra, which is the tube that urine flows through as it leaves the bladder. The result is difficulty urinating, weak urine streams, and frequent urgent needs to urinate. BPH is the most common prostate problem faced by men over 50.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLFortunately for men who suffer from BPH, medical progress is on their side. According to Dr. David S. Harris, “We now have new tools and less invasive ways of treating guys with blockage.” One of the tools he is referring to is called UroLift. This clever cutting-edge procedure is changing the way the condition is treated and how men live post-BPH.

Before UroLift, in order to open the channel in the urethra a scope would be inserted through the penis to cut and remove tissue from the blocked channel. In other instances, urologists would use a heat method to destroy prostate tissue. Although this procedure would decrease the size of the prostate to relieve pressure on the channel, it required general anesthesia and resulted in a great deal of irritation and inflammation, as well a long recovery time.

UroLift has replaced these invasive procedures. UroLift is a small implant that is placed in the urethra and compresses the tissue that is causing the blockage, opening the channel for the flow of urine. This new implant dramatically improves the strength of urine flow. It also helps create normal patterns of urination, thereby stopping the frequent, strong urges to urinate. It brings men back to normal.

The UroLift procedure is minimally invasive and is well tolerated by patients. Another huge benefit is that UroLift has far fewer side effects than previous BPH procedures. One of the main negative side effects of previous BPH treatments was that they caused sexual problems by affecting a man’s ability to get and maintain an erection for intercourse. Thanks to UroLift, sexually active men do not have to choose between their sex lives and treating their BPH.

UroLift may be the best option for men who wish to take back their lives from the symptoms of BPH without resorting to an invasive procedure. Make an appointment for a consultation with Dr. David Harris or one of the many board certified urology specialists at Advanced Urology Insitute to find out if Urolift will work for you. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Insitute website.

BPH Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a condition in which the male prostate gland interferes with the outflow of urine from the bladder. It is the most common prostate problem for men 50 and older. BPH is caused by an enlarged prostate that blocks the flow of urine. The enlarged prostate pinches the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine out of the body.

The symptoms of BPH are similar to what happens when you step on a running hose. The hose becomes pinched, blocking the flow of water and weakening the stream coming out. People dealing with BPH will have trouble starting to urinate and a weak urine stream. They will strain to urinate, with the flow stopping and starting several times. Another major symptom is frequent urination. Frequent, strong urges to urinate often disrupt sleep and everyday life. This is the symptom that brings men to their urologist.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLOnce an appointment is made with the urologist, doctor and patient can begin discussing symptoms and the diagnostic process. If the patient’s complaints are consistent with BPH, the urologist will proceed with a prostate exam. There are also other simple, non-invasive tests that can be completed at the urologist’s office that will indicate the patient’s urine flow and ability to empty his bladder. More sophisticated testing is available if additional data on the patient’s BPH issue is needed. For example, fiber optic scope evaluations give the urologist the most detailed picture of the patient’s BPH, which can then be used to devise the best treatment plan.

Treatment for BPH depends on many factors. For some men, mild symptoms can be managed with slight lifestyle changes and without medical intervention. For men with more severe symptoms, there are a variety of treatment options available. Oral medications can help relax the muscles around the prostate to allow easier urine flow. In serious cases, when medication is not enough, there are surgeries that can treat BPH. One cutting-edge option, that is less invasive than surgery and carries fewer side effects than medication, is Urolift. This minimally invasive procedure implants a stint in the urethra that opens the flow of urine and minimizes the symptoms of BPH.

BPH is a common medical issue that affects men and impacts their lives. As Dr. David S. Harris explains, “In general, many of our guys can tell you every bathroom from Lowe’s to Publix.” Living with BPH means having to plan their lives around the frequent and urgent need to urinate. The urologists at the Advanced Urology Institute work closely with patients to find the best way to solve their BPH-related issues.

Patient Communication: COVID-19

Coronavirus

Reschedule Appointment if you have Flu Symptoms

For patients who are experiencing flu symptoms: please reschedule your appointment for another time.

Please stay home if you are experiencing flu symptoms including fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, aching, headache, fatigue, or have recently traveled out of the country or been on a cruise ship. The flu virus can spread very easily from person to person.

For the safety of patients, employees, and physicians, we will be implemented visitor restrictions to our facilities effective Wednesday, March 17th.

Patients who are minors, have disabilities, or need a translator will be allowed 1 companion. All other parties will be asked to wait outside of the facility. Please call to reschedule your appointment today if you are having any of the above stated symptoms. We are happy to reschedule you for a later date without penalty.

How common is erectile dysfuntion?

Erectile dysfunction, also known as ED, is the inability of a man to get or maintain an erection firm enough for intercourse. ED is a very common issue that can negatively affect a man’s self-confidence and his relationship with his partner. Many men see urologists for help with ED when this happens.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLThe primary symptom of ED is trouble getting and maintaining an erection, and reduced sexual desire is often associated with it. There are many factors that can cause ED, and they can be divided into two categories: mental and physical. Depression, anxiety and stress are mental factors that can cause ED. There are also physical factors, including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and substance abuse. There are plenty of cases when it is a combination of mental and physical factors that cause ED.

All men are at risk for erectile dysfunction; however, there are some factors that increase the likelihood of developing it. Heart disease and diabetes are key risk factors that increase the likelihood of ED. Tobacco use causes damage to arteries, restricting blood flow and raising the chances of ED. Drug and alcohol use are risk factors as well. Men who are overweight, and especially those who are obese, are also at greater risk of developing erectile dysfunction.

A urologist can diagnose ED by performing a physical exam and asking a few questions. Once diagnosed, urologists can consider a variety of options for treatment, depending on the patient. The first option is usually oral medication. Urologists will try different medications to help patients maintain erections. If none are effective, then the urologist may prescribe injections. Small injections can be made to the shaft of the penis that dilate the blood vessels in the penis, allowing better blood flow and erections. The patient can administer these injections himself as needed.

Erectile dysfunction is not uncommon and as Dr. David Harris says about treating it, “As urologists, we are the leading authority.” Urologists see cases of ED on a daily basis and are accustomed to having conversations about it and finding the best way to solve the issue with their patients. In most cases a patient who is motivated to work with his urologist on finding the best treatment will eventually find a solution that works. The Advanced Urology Institute helps many patients explore their options and treat their ED so they can continue their normal lives and activities. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Kidney Stones: Who is at Risk

Kidney stones are a common medical issue that arises when hard deposits of minerals form in the kidney and can affect the urinary tract. These stones can cause severe pain in the abdomen and groin, nausea, and pain during urination. Kidney stones have no single or set cause. Anyone is at risk of developing kidney stones at some point in life.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLAlthough anyone can develop stones, there are certain factors that can indicate who gets them and how they occur. As urologist Dr. David S. Harris states, “There are certain features of a person’s stone history that are predictors to us if they’re going to have more stones.” A patient suffering from kidney stones will want to consult a urologist to see what can be done to limit the chances of developing kidney stones in the future.

A urologist may want to do a urine or blood analysis to see if there are any reasons for a patient to develop kidney stones. A urologist also may want to address some common risk factors for kidney stones. For instance, dehydration is a very common cause of kidney stones. For this reason, people who live in warm climates and are at greater risk of dehydration are also at greater risk of developing kidney stones. A urologist may recommend that someone living in a warm climate like Florida drink plenty of fluids every day.

People with diets high in salt, protein and sugar are also at increased risk of developing kidney stones. Too much salt especially increases the amount of calcium a person’s kidneys must filter, increasing the chances of stone development. Obesity also increases the risk of developing kidney stones, so weight management is something a urologist will strongly recommend if that is a factor.

Beside dehydration and dietary choices, genetics can play an important role in an individual’s risk of developing kidney stones. If someone in your family has kidney stones, then you are more likely to develop them as well. And once you develop kidney stones you are at a greater chance of developing stones in the future. For this reason, in addition to adjustments in water intake and diet, urologists sometimes will recommend medications.

Just because someone has had kidney stones before doesn’t mean they will have to suffer with them the rest of their lives. At the Advanced Urology Institute, doctors work with their patients to find and correct root causes for kidney stones. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.