Women have many treatment options for urinary incontinence

Female Urinary Incontinence: Lauren Masters, ARNPMy name is Lauren Masters with Advanced Urology Institute. When we’re looking at urinary incontinence, for example, most women are having some degree of incontinence; whether it be soaking through one (1) pad a day or wearing depends all day long.

Usually we can get someone at a minimum to a 50% improvement. It varies based on your history, your basic demographic and whatever else is going on in your body, but a lot of times we can get you to a good 50% and there are many women we can get to 80-90 [percent] and even a complete resolution of their issues.

Spanish Speaking Urologists at Fort Myers, FL

Luis Camacho, PA of Fort Myers, FLMy name is Luis Camacho. I am with Advanced Urology Institute. Dr Harris and I serve patients who speak Spanish. Spanish is my mother tongue and we want patients to feel comfortable in their own language. Sometimes, there are communication issues and when we speak our main language, we communicate better. Patients feel more comfortable. Our goal is to reach a bigger Hispanic audience so we can offer them a proper service for any urological condition they might have. Regardless if there are prostate problems, erection problems, [or] kidney stones, there are a lot of treatments we can provide in this field.

UroLift Procedure for BPH

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) can be described as the blockage of urine as it tries to flow from the bladder, through the urethra, and out of the body. It occurs when an enlarged prostate begins to pinch the urethra, which is the tube that urine flows through as it leaves the bladder. The result is difficulty urinating, weak urine streams, and frequent urgent needs to urinate. BPH is the most common prostate problem faced by men over 50.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLFortunately for men who suffer from BPH, medical progress is on their side. According to Dr. David S. Harris, “We now have new tools and less invasive ways of treating guys with blockage.” One of the tools he is referring to is called UroLift. This clever cutting-edge procedure is changing the way the condition is treated and how men live post-BPH.

Before UroLift, in order to open the channel in the urethra a scope would be inserted through the penis to cut and remove tissue from the blocked channel. In other instances, urologists would use a heat method to destroy prostate tissue. Although this procedure would decrease the size of the prostate to relieve pressure on the channel, it required general anesthesia and resulted in a great deal of irritation and inflammation, as well a long recovery time.

UroLift has replaced these invasive procedures. UroLift is a small implant that is placed in the urethra and compresses the tissue that is causing the blockage, opening the channel for the flow of urine. This new implant dramatically improves the strength of urine flow. It also helps create normal patterns of urination, thereby stopping the frequent, strong urges to urinate. It brings men back to normal.

The UroLift procedure is minimally invasive and is well tolerated by patients. Another huge benefit is that UroLift has far fewer side effects than previous BPH procedures. One of the main negative side effects of previous BPH treatments was that they caused sexual problems by affecting a man’s ability to get and maintain an erection for intercourse. Thanks to UroLift, sexually active men do not have to choose between their sex lives and treating their BPH.

UroLift may be the best option for men who wish to take back their lives from the symptoms of BPH without resorting to an invasive procedure. Make an appointment for a consultation with Dr. David Harris or one of the many board certified urology specialists at Advanced Urology Insitute to find out if Urolift will work for you. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Insitute website.

BPH Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a condition in which the male prostate gland interferes with the outflow of urine from the bladder. It is the most common prostate problem for men 50 and older. BPH is caused by an enlarged prostate that blocks the flow of urine. The enlarged prostate pinches the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine out of the body.

The symptoms of BPH are similar to what happens when you step on a running hose. The hose becomes pinched, blocking the flow of water and weakening the stream coming out. People dealing with BPH will have trouble starting to urinate and a weak urine stream. They will strain to urinate, with the flow stopping and starting several times. Another major symptom is frequent urination. Frequent, strong urges to urinate often disrupt sleep and everyday life. This is the symptom that brings men to their urologist.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLOnce an appointment is made with the urologist, doctor and patient can begin discussing symptoms and the diagnostic process. If the patient’s complaints are consistent with BPH, the urologist will proceed with a prostate exam. There are also other simple, non-invasive tests that can be completed at the urologist’s office that will indicate the patient’s urine flow and ability to empty his bladder. More sophisticated testing is available if additional data on the patient’s BPH issue is needed. For example, fiber optic scope evaluations give the urologist the most detailed picture of the patient’s BPH, which can then be used to devise the best treatment plan.

Treatment for BPH depends on many factors. For some men, mild symptoms can be managed with slight lifestyle changes and without medical intervention. For men with more severe symptoms, there are a variety of treatment options available. Oral medications can help relax the muscles around the prostate to allow easier urine flow. In serious cases, when medication is not enough, there are surgeries that can treat BPH. One cutting-edge option, that is less invasive than surgery and carries fewer side effects than medication, is Urolift. This minimally invasive procedure implants a stint in the urethra that opens the flow of urine and minimizes the symptoms of BPH.

BPH is a common medical issue that affects men and impacts their lives. As Dr. David S. Harris explains, “In general, many of our guys can tell you every bathroom from Lowe’s to Publix.” Living with BPH means having to plan their lives around the frequent and urgent need to urinate. The urologists at the Advanced Urology Institute work closely with patients to find the best way to solve their BPH-related issues.

Fort Myers Office: Working Together For You

Collaboration between medical staff and patients is one of the most important aspects of medical care. Achieving successful outcomes happens when everyone involved works together. Medical offices that create spaces for this to happen are laying the groundwork for the best treatment possible. In describing the medical office he works in, Luis Camacho PA says, “Patients feel they are in a good atmosphere, where they can be treated respectfully.” A place like this is where patients and staff can work together.

Urology offices, like other medical offices, benefit from this collaboration. Each patient has unique needs based on their ailment, medical history, age, and many other factors. In a comfortable atmosphere, patients who feel at ease describing their medical issues can give urologist a clearer picture of their patients’ unique situations and the best approach to treatment. Whether the patient is suffering from problems with their prostate, kidneys, urinary track, erectile dysfunction, or any other issue, working together helps lead to a better outcome.

Luis Camacho PA of Fort Myers, FLFor instance, many men suffer from the negative side effects of an enlarging prostate as they age, and yet the best treatment for this is not the same for every patient. For some, diet and lifestyle adjustments may be all they need to treat their side effects, while some may need medication as well. For men with a more serious issue, their urologist may want to perform a transurethral resection of the prostate. For this procedure, a small device is used to trim away excess tissue from the prostate to shrink its size. There are other options, but what is important is tracking progress with your urologist.

Another common issue that patients and urologists work together on is treating kidney stones. Treatment will be determined by the size of the kidney stones, patient’s health, and pain level. If possible, the urologist may recommend non-invasive options like shock wave lithotripsy where water waves are directed at the stone, breaking it up into small pieces like sand that are easier to pass. For larger, more stubborn stones, the urologist may have to use an invasive option. An example of this would be making a small incision in the patient and inserting a scope to break up the stones.

No matter the issue that brings a patient into a urologist’s office, collaboration between patient and doctor is essential. A comfortable atmosphere, free of judgment, language barriers, or miscommunication is the best start to treatment. The Advance Urology Institute in Fort Myers understands the importance of creating this kind of atmosphere and does so every day.

What to know about Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction, also commonly referred to as ED, is the inability for a man to maintain an erection for sexual activity. Although it can be an embarrassing subject to talk about, it is very common. Fifty percent of men over the age of 50 experience some degree of ED. It is important to know that there are plenty of treatment options available. As Luis Camacho, PA explains, “We have several patients with erectile dysfunction, and we can be very helpful with treatment and procedures.”

Luis Camacho, PA of Fort Myers, FLA man experiencing the symptoms of erectile dysfunction can make an appointment to discuss the issue with his urologist. A conversation about the patient’s medical history and symptoms can usually lead to an in-office diagnosis. Once diagnosed, and it is determined that the patient is healthy enough for sexual activity, the urologist and patient can discuss treatment options. Many patients find themselves surprised by the number of treatment options available to them.

The most common and familiar treatment for ED is medication. Pills are easy to take and highly effective in many cases. For this reason, most urologists start treating ED by prescribing one of the many pill options available. Another simple option is the vacuum erection device. For this treatment, a man inserts his penis into the cylindrical pump that works like a vacuum to draw blood to the penis resulting in an erection. A band then goes around the base of penis in order to maintain the erection. Yet another option is injection therapy. A patient using this therapy will give himself a small, nearly painless injection into the base of the penis. The injection stimulates an erection for a certain amount of time.

Some cases call for more invasive treatments. With a penile prothesis, an implant is surgically inserted into the penis. A pump in the scrotum that is attached to the prosthesis is used to create the erection.

When facing erectile dysfunction, it is important to know that you are not the only person dealing with this issue, and there are plenty of treatment options available that help men lead normal and satisfying sexual lives. All it takes is a conversation with a urologist at the Advanced Urology Institute to find the best ED treatment for you.

Patient Communication: COVID-19

Coronavirus

Reschedule Appointment if you have Flu Symptoms

For patients who are experiencing flu symptoms: please reschedule your appointment for another time.

Please stay home if you are experiencing flu symptoms including fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, aching, headache, fatigue, or have recently traveled out of the country or been on a cruise ship. The flu virus can spread very easily from person to person.

For the safety of patients, employees, and physicians, we will be implemented visitor restrictions to our facilities effective Wednesday, March 17th.

Patients who are minors, have disabilities, or need a translator will be allowed 1 companion. All other parties will be asked to wait outside of the facility. Please call to reschedule your appointment today if you are having any of the above stated symptoms. We are happy to reschedule you for a later date without penalty.

How common is erectile dysfuntion?

Erectile dysfunction, also known as ED, is the inability of a man to get or maintain an erection firm enough for intercourse. ED is a very common issue that can negatively affect a man’s self-confidence and his relationship with his partner. Many men see urologists for help with ED when this happens.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLThe primary symptom of ED is trouble getting and maintaining an erection, and reduced sexual desire is often associated with it. There are many factors that can cause ED, and they can be divided into two categories: mental and physical. Depression, anxiety and stress are mental factors that can cause ED. There are also physical factors, including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and substance abuse. There are plenty of cases when it is a combination of mental and physical factors that cause ED.

All men are at risk for erectile dysfunction; however, there are some factors that increase the likelihood of developing it. Heart disease and diabetes are key risk factors that increase the likelihood of ED. Tobacco use causes damage to arteries, restricting blood flow and raising the chances of ED. Drug and alcohol use are risk factors as well. Men who are overweight, and especially those who are obese, are also at greater risk of developing erectile dysfunction.

A urologist can diagnose ED by performing a physical exam and asking a few questions. Once diagnosed, urologists can consider a variety of options for treatment, depending on the patient. The first option is usually oral medication. Urologists will try different medications to help patients maintain erections. If none are effective, then the urologist may prescribe injections. Small injections can be made to the shaft of the penis that dilate the blood vessels in the penis, allowing better blood flow and erections. The patient can administer these injections himself as needed.

Erectile dysfunction is not uncommon and as Dr. David Harris says about treating it, “As urologists, we are the leading authority.” Urologists see cases of ED on a daily basis and are accustomed to having conversations about it and finding the best way to solve the issue with their patients. In most cases a patient who is motivated to work with his urologist on finding the best treatment will eventually find a solution that works. The Advanced Urology Institute helps many patients explore their options and treat their ED so they can continue their normal lives and activities. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Kidney Stones: Who is at Risk

Kidney stones are a common medical issue that arises when hard deposits of minerals form in the kidney and can affect the urinary tract. These stones can cause severe pain in the abdomen and groin, nausea, and pain during urination. Kidney stones have no single or set cause. Anyone is at risk of developing kidney stones at some point in life.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLAlthough anyone can develop stones, there are certain factors that can indicate who gets them and how they occur. As urologist Dr. David S. Harris states, “There are certain features of a person’s stone history that are predictors to us if they’re going to have more stones.” A patient suffering from kidney stones will want to consult a urologist to see what can be done to limit the chances of developing kidney stones in the future.

A urologist may want to do a urine or blood analysis to see if there are any reasons for a patient to develop kidney stones. A urologist also may want to address some common risk factors for kidney stones. For instance, dehydration is a very common cause of kidney stones. For this reason, people who live in warm climates and are at greater risk of dehydration are also at greater risk of developing kidney stones. A urologist may recommend that someone living in a warm climate like Florida drink plenty of fluids every day.

People with diets high in salt, protein and sugar are also at increased risk of developing kidney stones. Too much salt especially increases the amount of calcium a person’s kidneys must filter, increasing the chances of stone development. Obesity also increases the risk of developing kidney stones, so weight management is something a urologist will strongly recommend if that is a factor.

Beside dehydration and dietary choices, genetics can play an important role in an individual’s risk of developing kidney stones. If someone in your family has kidney stones, then you are more likely to develop them as well. And once you develop kidney stones you are at a greater chance of developing stones in the future. For this reason, in addition to adjustments in water intake and diet, urologists sometimes will recommend medications.

Just because someone has had kidney stones before doesn’t mean they will have to suffer with them the rest of their lives. At the Advanced Urology Institute, doctors work with their patients to find and correct root causes for kidney stones. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Bladder Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment – Dr. David Harris

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with bladder cancer, you probably have a lot of questions. The physicians at Advanced Urology Institute are experts in treating this type of cancer and will be there to guide you from diagnosis to recovery.

How Is Bladder Cancer Diagnosed?

One of the most common signs of bladder cancer is blood in the urine. You may notice this at home on your own, or a doctor might notice trace amounts during routine urine testing. The doctor will be able to determine if further testing is necessary, the next round of which includes more urinalysis tests, x-rays and a bladder exam.

Urologist Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLDr. David Harris with AUI Fort Myers explains, “If we find a tumor, that tumor would be removed from inside the bladder and biopsied.” Dr. Harris reassures patients that most tumors found in the bladder are non-invasive and highly treatable.

How Is Bladder Cancer Treated?

Surgical intervention is used in most treatment plans for bladder cancer, either alone or along with another form of treatment. For patients whose tumors have grown into the muscle of their bladder, radical cystectomy (removal of the bladder) may be necessary. This procedure may also be recommended for patients who have a fast-growing tumor in the early stages of bladder cancer to prevent a future recurrence. Radiation and chemotherapy are often part of the treatment, especially for patients who are in the later stages of bladder cancer.

What Is The Prognosis For Patients With Bladder Cancer?

Compared to other cancers, the prognosis for patients with bladder cancer is good. The general 5-year survival rate for bladder cancer patients is 77 percent; the 15-year survival rate is 65 percent. Patients may need ongoing regular treatment to keep the cancer in check. It is important to keep all follow-up appointments to monitor recovery and make sure the cancer has not returned. Patients who have undergone a cystectomy will be fitted with a device to help them urinate; the exact solution varies depending on the type of surgery performed, but patients are commonly fitted with a urostomy bag. Although this does introduce new challenges, patients are able to resume most normal daily routines and enjoy a high quality of life.

Whatever your diagnosis, remember that you are not alone in your journey to recovery. Dr. Harris reassures patients that at AUI, “we’re trying to preserve bladders, trying to minimize problems with quality of life.” For more information on how our team of urology experts can help, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.