How Often Should Women See A Urologist

Female Urinary Incontinence: Lauren Masters, ARNPMy name is Lauren Masters with Advanced Urology Institute.

When we’re looking at urinary incontinence, for example, most women are having some degree of incontinence; whether it be soaking through one (1) pad a day or wearing depends all day long. Usually we can get someone at a minimum to a 50% improvement. It varies based on your history, your basic demographic and whatever else is going on in your body, but a lot of times we can get you to a good 50% and there are many women we can get to 80-90 [percent] and even a complete resolution of their issues.

Women have many treatment options for urinary incontinence

Female Urinary Incontinence: Lauren Masters, ARNPMy name is Lauren Masters with Advanced Urology Institute. When we’re looking at urinary incontinence, for example, most women are having some degree of incontinence; whether it be soaking through one (1) pad a day or wearing depends all day long.

Usually we can get someone at a minimum to a 50% improvement. It varies based on your history, your basic demographic and whatever else is going on in your body, but a lot of times we can get you to a good 50% and there are many women we can get to 80-90 [percent] and even a complete resolution of their issues.

Spanish Speaking Urologists at Fort Myers, FL

Luis Camacho, PA of Fort Myers, FLMy name is Luis Camacho. I am with Advanced Urology Institute. Dr Harris and I serve patients who speak Spanish. Spanish is my mother tongue and we want patients to feel comfortable in their own language. Sometimes, there are communication issues and when we speak our main language, we communicate better. Patients feel more comfortable. Our goal is to reach a bigger Hispanic audience so we can offer them a proper service for any urological condition they might have. Regardless if there are prostate problems, erection problems, [or] kidney stones, there are a lot of treatments we can provide in this field.

UroLift Procedure for BPH

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) can be described as the blockage of urine as it tries to flow from the bladder, through the urethra, and out of the body. It occurs when an enlarged prostate begins to pinch the urethra, which is the tube that urine flows through as it leaves the bladder. The result is difficulty urinating, weak urine streams, and frequent urgent needs to urinate. BPH is the most common prostate problem faced by men over 50.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLFortunately for men who suffer from BPH, medical progress is on their side. According to Dr. David S. Harris, “We now have new tools and less invasive ways of treating guys with blockage.” One of the tools he is referring to is called UroLift. This clever cutting-edge procedure is changing the way the condition is treated and how men live post-BPH.

Before UroLift, in order to open the channel in the urethra a scope would be inserted through the penis to cut and remove tissue from the blocked channel. In other instances, urologists would use a heat method to destroy prostate tissue. Although this procedure would decrease the size of the prostate to relieve pressure on the channel, it required general anesthesia and resulted in a great deal of irritation and inflammation, as well a long recovery time.

UroLift has replaced these invasive procedures. UroLift is a small implant that is placed in the urethra and compresses the tissue that is causing the blockage, opening the channel for the flow of urine. This new implant dramatically improves the strength of urine flow. It also helps create normal patterns of urination, thereby stopping the frequent, strong urges to urinate. It brings men back to normal.

The UroLift procedure is minimally invasive and is well tolerated by patients. Another huge benefit is that UroLift has far fewer side effects than previous BPH procedures. One of the main negative side effects of previous BPH treatments was that they caused sexual problems by affecting a man’s ability to get and maintain an erection for intercourse. Thanks to UroLift, sexually active men do not have to choose between their sex lives and treating their BPH.

UroLift may be the best option for men who wish to take back their lives from the symptoms of BPH without resorting to an invasive procedure. Make an appointment for a consultation with Dr. David Harris or one of the many board certified urology specialists at Advanced Urology Insitute to find out if Urolift will work for you. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Insitute website.

What to know about Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction, also commonly referred to as ED, is the inability for a man to maintain an erection for sexual activity. Although it can be an embarrassing subject to talk about, it is very common. Fifty percent of men over the age of 50 experience some degree of ED. It is important to know that there are plenty of treatment options available. As Luis Camacho, PA explains, “We have several patients with erectile dysfunction, and we can be very helpful with treatment and procedures.”

Luis Camacho, PA of Fort Myers, FLA man experiencing the symptoms of erectile dysfunction can make an appointment to discuss the issue with his urologist. A conversation about the patient’s medical history and symptoms can usually lead to an in-office diagnosis. Once diagnosed, and it is determined that the patient is healthy enough for sexual activity, the urologist and patient can discuss treatment options. Many patients find themselves surprised by the number of treatment options available to them.

The most common and familiar treatment for ED is medication. Pills are easy to take and highly effective in many cases. For this reason, most urologists start treating ED by prescribing one of the many pill options available. Another simple option is the vacuum erection device. For this treatment, a man inserts his penis into the cylindrical pump that works like a vacuum to draw blood to the penis resulting in an erection. A band then goes around the base of penis in order to maintain the erection. Yet another option is injection therapy. A patient using this therapy will give himself a small, nearly painless injection into the base of the penis. The injection stimulates an erection for a certain amount of time.

Some cases call for more invasive treatments. With a penile prothesis, an implant is surgically inserted into the penis. A pump in the scrotum that is attached to the prosthesis is used to create the erection.

When facing erectile dysfunction, it is important to know that you are not the only person dealing with this issue, and there are plenty of treatment options available that help men lead normal and satisfying sexual lives. All it takes is a conversation with a urologist at the Advanced Urology Institute to find the best ED treatment for you.

How common is erectile dysfuntion?

Erectile dysfunction, also known as ED, is the inability of a man to get or maintain an erection firm enough for intercourse. ED is a very common issue that can negatively affect a man’s self-confidence and his relationship with his partner. Many men see urologists for help with ED when this happens.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLThe primary symptom of ED is trouble getting and maintaining an erection, and reduced sexual desire is often associated with it. There are many factors that can cause ED, and they can be divided into two categories: mental and physical. Depression, anxiety and stress are mental factors that can cause ED. There are also physical factors, including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and substance abuse. There are plenty of cases when it is a combination of mental and physical factors that cause ED.

All men are at risk for erectile dysfunction; however, there are some factors that increase the likelihood of developing it. Heart disease and diabetes are key risk factors that increase the likelihood of ED. Tobacco use causes damage to arteries, restricting blood flow and raising the chances of ED. Drug and alcohol use are risk factors as well. Men who are overweight, and especially those who are obese, are also at greater risk of developing erectile dysfunction.

A urologist can diagnose ED by performing a physical exam and asking a few questions. Once diagnosed, urologists can consider a variety of options for treatment, depending on the patient. The first option is usually oral medication. Urologists will try different medications to help patients maintain erections. If none are effective, then the urologist may prescribe injections. Small injections can be made to the shaft of the penis that dilate the blood vessels in the penis, allowing better blood flow and erections. The patient can administer these injections himself as needed.

Erectile dysfunction is not uncommon and as Dr. David Harris says about treating it, “As urologists, we are the leading authority.” Urologists see cases of ED on a daily basis and are accustomed to having conversations about it and finding the best way to solve the issue with their patients. In most cases a patient who is motivated to work with his urologist on finding the best treatment will eventually find a solution that works. The Advanced Urology Institute helps many patients explore their options and treat their ED so they can continue their normal lives and activities. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Kidney Stones: Who is at Risk

Kidney stones are a common medical issue that arises when hard deposits of minerals form in the kidney and can affect the urinary tract. These stones can cause severe pain in the abdomen and groin, nausea, and pain during urination. Kidney stones have no single or set cause. Anyone is at risk of developing kidney stones at some point in life.

Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLAlthough anyone can develop stones, there are certain factors that can indicate who gets them and how they occur. As urologist Dr. David S. Harris states, “There are certain features of a person’s stone history that are predictors to us if they’re going to have more stones.” A patient suffering from kidney stones will want to consult a urologist to see what can be done to limit the chances of developing kidney stones in the future.

A urologist may want to do a urine or blood analysis to see if there are any reasons for a patient to develop kidney stones. A urologist also may want to address some common risk factors for kidney stones. For instance, dehydration is a very common cause of kidney stones. For this reason, people who live in warm climates and are at greater risk of dehydration are also at greater risk of developing kidney stones. A urologist may recommend that someone living in a warm climate like Florida drink plenty of fluids every day.

People with diets high in salt, protein and sugar are also at increased risk of developing kidney stones. Too much salt especially increases the amount of calcium a person’s kidneys must filter, increasing the chances of stone development. Obesity also increases the risk of developing kidney stones, so weight management is something a urologist will strongly recommend if that is a factor.

Beside dehydration and dietary choices, genetics can play an important role in an individual’s risk of developing kidney stones. If someone in your family has kidney stones, then you are more likely to develop them as well. And once you develop kidney stones you are at a greater chance of developing stones in the future. For this reason, in addition to adjustments in water intake and diet, urologists sometimes will recommend medications.

Just because someone has had kidney stones before doesn’t mean they will have to suffer with them the rest of their lives. At the Advanced Urology Institute, doctors work with their patients to find and correct root causes for kidney stones. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Bladder Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment – Dr. David Harris

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with bladder cancer, you probably have a lot of questions. The physicians at Advanced Urology Institute are experts in treating this type of cancer and will be there to guide you from diagnosis to recovery.

How Is Bladder Cancer Diagnosed?

One of the most common signs of bladder cancer is blood in the urine. You may notice this at home on your own, or a doctor might notice trace amounts during routine urine testing. The doctor will be able to determine if further testing is necessary, the next round of which includes more urinalysis tests, x-rays and a bladder exam.

Urologist Dr. David Harris of Fort Myers, FLDr. David Harris with AUI Fort Myers explains, “If we find a tumor, that tumor would be removed from inside the bladder and biopsied.” Dr. Harris reassures patients that most tumors found in the bladder are non-invasive and highly treatable.

How Is Bladder Cancer Treated?

Surgical intervention is used in most treatment plans for bladder cancer, either alone or along with another form of treatment. For patients whose tumors have grown into the muscle of their bladder, radical cystectomy (removal of the bladder) may be necessary. This procedure may also be recommended for patients who have a fast-growing tumor in the early stages of bladder cancer to prevent a future recurrence. Radiation and chemotherapy are often part of the treatment, especially for patients who are in the later stages of bladder cancer.

What Is The Prognosis For Patients With Bladder Cancer?

Compared to other cancers, the prognosis for patients with bladder cancer is good. The general 5-year survival rate for bladder cancer patients is 77 percent; the 15-year survival rate is 65 percent. Patients may need ongoing regular treatment to keep the cancer in check. It is important to keep all follow-up appointments to monitor recovery and make sure the cancer has not returned. Patients who have undergone a cystectomy will be fitted with a device to help them urinate; the exact solution varies depending on the type of surgery performed, but patients are commonly fitted with a urostomy bag. Although this does introduce new challenges, patients are able to resume most normal daily routines and enjoy a high quality of life.

Whatever your diagnosis, remember that you are not alone in your journey to recovery. Dr. Harris reassures patients that at AUI, “we’re trying to preserve bladders, trying to minimize problems with quality of life.” For more information on how our team of urology experts can help, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

How are Urinary Problems Treated?

Because urinary problems can be a sensitive and potentially embarrassing subject, many people are nervous about discussing these issues with their medical provider, even though they are very common conditions. Experts estimate that around a third of the U.S. population suffers from urinary incontinence. Luckily, these issues are treatable, according to Luis Camacho, PA, a physician assistant with the Advanced Urology Institute.

“If the patient has prostate problems, bladder problems, for the most part, the patient can be treated with oral medications,” Camacho explains. “If that is not effective, then we can incorporate different procedures or surgeries in order to improve the patient’s symptoms.”

Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence is the most common problem. There are five different types of incontinence, but one of the most common types is stress urinary incontinence, or SUI. SUI occurs when a patient’s pelvic muscles are weakened, allowing urine to escape during normal everyday movements, such as sneezing, coughing or bending over. This condition is particularly common with older women, especially those who have had children. SUI can be managed with lifestyle changes or pelvic floor strengthening exercises like kegels.

Another common type of incontinence is overactive bladder, or OAB. Patients dealing with OAB feel an urge to go to the bathroom frequently throughout the day and night, even though their bladder isn’t full. This urge can be difficult to ignore and can lead to a lot of stress for patients in their daily lives. OAB and SUI can occur together in a condition known as mixed incontinence.

Other Urinary Problems

Other common urinary problems that should be discussed with a doctor include urinary tract infections, also known as UTIs; hematuria, or blood in the urine; and urinary retention or frequent urination. These problems are often signs of a larger issue that should not be ignored, such as diabetes, kidney stones, or prostate or bladder cancer. It’s important to bring up any issues like these with a doctor to ensure that the underlying issues can be treated promptly.

Getting Help

Although urinary problems are common, that does not mean they should be ignored, especially when they could potentially be signs of a more serious problem. Medical professionals know how wide-ranging both the symptoms and causes of urinary problems can be. “It’s important to listen to the patient and then establish a course of assessments, so we can help the patient effectively,” Camacho says. He and the other experts at the Advanced Urology Institute understand the sensitive nature of urinary problems and are well-prepared to help patients deal with these issues and get back to living their lives with confidence. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.

Prostate Cancer Treatment: How to Choose What’s Best for You

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer that affects men. The prostate is a small gland, similar in shape to a walnut, that produces the seminal fluid that helps transport sperm. Although anyone can get prostate cancer, it becomes more common as men age.

It can be difficult to detect prostate cancer as it has little to no symptoms in its early stages. For this reason, it is important for men to have their prostate routinely checked by their doctor. Only after the cancer advances do symptoms occur like trouble urinating, blood in semen, bone pain, erectile dysfunction and discomfort in the pelvic area.

Advanced Urology Institute Doctor: Dr. David HarrisSome prostate cancers grow slowly and, in some cases, need little to no treatment. Other cancers can be aggressive and spread quickly. It is important to see your urologist often to monitor your cancer, as the best treatment for you will depend on the type of prostate cancer you have and how it reacts to treatment.

Treatments for prostate cancer vary depending on multiple factors. Urologists will look at a patient’s age, health and the type of prostate cancer when deciding on the best treatment. In a healthy young patient, a urologist may recommend robotic surgery or a radical prostatectomy. These are well-tested and invasive treatments that can produce very good outcomes.

For patients who may be a little older and not in the best of health, radiation therapy may be their best option. Having access to quality radiation therapy can be a game changer in prostate cancer treatment and can create excellent outcomes. It also will be easier on a patient with other health issues.

There are also newer advances that can be used to treat prostate cancer. For example, cryotherapy uses extremely cold temperatures to destroy cancerous tissues in the prostate by freezing them. Another example is HIFU therapy. This stands for stands for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound and uses an intense ultrasound, focused on the prostate, to treat the cancer and is minimally invasive.

Prostate cancer is a serious and often frightening prospect. Many men will suffer from this cancer, but they are not alone. Along with their urologist, men can combat their cancer in a way that produces the best outcomes. Dedicated urologists, like David S. Harris, MD at Advanced Urology Institute, have an arsenal of treatment options and are ready to help men live healthy lives. For more information, visit the Advanced Urology Institute website.